Meet Dr. Scott

The Doctor Is In

Meet the mother, doctor, and innovator behind Tortle.

Dr. Jane Scott impressively possesses a blended experience of Neonatology and Pediatrics. Throughout her career, she has cared for and saved the lives of patients small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, and those beaming with pride over their recent potty training. 

Born in Kenya, Dr. Jane attended the University of Western Australia in Perth. After moving to the United States, she attended the University of Colorado Medical School, completing both a residency in Pediatrics and a fellowship in Neonatology at Duke University. Oh, and did we mention she did it all while simultaneously raising four children?

Dr. Scott went on to become a Staff Neonatologist at Denver's St. Joseph's Hospital, where she remained for six years, until she was recruited to build Twin Falls, Idaho’s St. Luke’s Magic Valley Hospital NICU from a Level 1 to a Level 3A unit. Dr. Scott eventually returned to Colorado in 2011, with the growing inspiration to improve the wellbeing of babies everywhere. After working for 30 years in and around NICUs, she experienced first-hand the need for better quality infant positioning, specifically with sick infants. 

Her vast experience in caring for patients both premature and newborn, and sometimes even through adolescence, makes her uniquely qualified, and us astonishingly proud to call her the creator of the Tortle.

Step Into Our Doctor's Office with FAQs

We’re here to answer your most commonly asked Flat Head Syndrome questions.

HOW DO FLAT SPOTS DEVELOP?

From ages 0-6 months babies' brains grow very rapidly so their skulls must be soft enough to accommodate their growth. The problem? When newborns and young infants start spending too much time on their backs in one position. This is when flat spots begin developing. However, Flat Head Syndrome may occur even before your baby is born due to birthing issues, pregnancy problems, and congenital abnormalities.

WHY SHOULD I BE CONCERNED ABOUT FLAT HEAD SYNDROME?

Because one in three healthy babies will develop some degree of flat head syndrome after birth. All babies are at risk, and it’s even more common with multiple or premature births. But don’t panic! It’s preventable.

IS THIS NEW? WHY HAVEN’T I HEARD OF IT BEFORE?

Flat Head Syndrome has increased 600% in the last twenty years, and current medical thinking points to two lifestyle changes as the cause. In 1992 The American Academy of Pediatrics began its “ Back to Sleep” program to reduce Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). And it worked: the incidence of SIDS has plummeted by almost 40%. Now, infants are placed in reclining carrying devices more than ever. Families on the go keep their babies in carriers, car seats, and swings for an extended time—frequently up to 15-18 hours per day.

WILL THIS CAUSE MY BABY PERMANENT PROBLEMS?

The effects of skull deformation can be permanent. Beyond the cosmetic issues, there can be trouble with binocular vision and long-term developmental issues.

HOW DO I PREVENT FLAT HEAD SYNDROME?

The best method of prevention is diligent head repositioning. Newborn infants sleep the majority of the time, so it’s important they spend that time sleeping on their backs. Therefore, you should change your baby’s head positioning after each feeding, alternating sides so your baby doesn’t develop a favorite. Provide distractions to entice your baby to look to alternate sides, perhaps putting a favorite toy on their less favored side. Another helpful tactic is to turn them around in the crib so they naturally turn toward you, the parent, and the activity in the room.

WHAT IF MY BABY ALREADY HAS FLAT HEAD SYNDROME?

Once positional plagiocephaly / brachycephaly (or flat spots) has been diagnosed, most physicians recommend reposition therapy. This involves positioning your baby to avoid putting pressure on the flattened areas. But in practice repositioning can be difficult, as babies often automatically revert to their preferred side.If your baby has been diagnosed and it’s beyond the window to try reposition therapy, there is a high rate of success with treatment that is a combination of helmet and physical therapy. See your doctor and a specialist for more information.